Accepted Manuscripts

The following documents must be provided after acceptance:

Additionally, if your manuscript is based on a dissertation and you wish to be considered for the annual Ferber Award, complete the eligibility form and return it via email to the editorial office.

Authors of accepted manuscripts should also review the following guidelines carefully prior to submitting the final version of their accepted manuscript:


Final Manuscript

The final version of the manuscript must be formatted in accordance with our style guide and should include the following items, in the following order:

This will be your final opportunity to make changes before you receive the proof.

The copyeditor does not check manuscripts for the accuracy of technical or quantitative aspects; it is the author’s responsibility to ensure that all such details are clear and correct.

At the proofing stage, the publisher will allow corrections to typos, formatting, and factual errors only. Therefore, it is imperative to prepare the final version of your manuscript carefully:

  • Verify that all author names and affiliations are correct.
  • Check all statistics, formulas, tables, and figures for technical accuracy.
  • Make sure your references are accurate and complete (i.e., there must be a reference for every citation and a citation for every reference).
  • If you removed identifying information from your manuscript to ensure anonymity during the review process (e.g., in the methods sections where data collection and participant pools are discussed), make sure to add it to the final version for publication.
  • Ensure all comments among authors have been removed, all tracked changes have been accepted or rejected, and that the “track changes” feature has been turned off.

For all matters not covered by our style guide, JCR follows the Chicago Manual of Style.

If you need assistance with proofreading or copyediting, our submission guidelines include a list of suggested professional editing services.


Article Title

The first page of the final manuscript should include the article title.

Consider changing your title if you believe a different title would do a better job of drawing a wide variety of potential readers. Online indexing databases and search engines such as Google Scholar and Web of Science use titles to categorize and display articles. A well-constructed and informative title should make your article discoverable to a larger number of scholars, which could lead to more citations.

Note:

  • Keep your title concise and clear (many titles can be shortened).
  • Use descriptive terms and phrases that accurately highlight the article’s core content.
  • Use title case (also referred to as headline case).

JCR titles follow Chicago Manual of Style rules on headline style capitalization:

  • Capitalize the first and last words.
  • Capitalize all other major words.
  • Lowercase articles (a, an, and the).
  • Lowercase as in any grammatical function.
  • Lowercase common coordinating conjunctions (and, but, for, or, and nor).
  • Lowercase the part of a proper name that would be lowercase in text (e.g., de or von).
  • Lowercase prepositions regardless of length except when they are used adverbially or adjectivally (e.g., up in Look Up, down in Turn Down, to in Come To) or when they compose part of a Latin expression used adjectivally or adverbially (e.g., De Facto, In Vitro).
  • Lowercase to not only as a preposition but also as part of an infinitive (to Run, to Hide, etc.).

Authorship List

The first page of the final manuscript should include a list of all author names following the article title.

Note:

  • List all names (centered) in order of authorship.
  • Capitalize each word (e.g., Annabelle L. Arthur).
  • The author order and the styling of author names (e.g., Jan Smith vs. Jan M. Smith) must match the order and styling in the author note on the second page.

Author Note

The second page of the final manuscript should include an author note with the following information for each author:

  • Full name
  • Email address
  • Current position
  • Current affiliation (i.e., department and university/institution)
  • Complete address (including city, state/province, and country)
  • Acknowledgments of financial, technical, or other assistance

The author note should also denote the following additional information as applicable:

  • The designated corresponding author
  • If your manuscript has a web appendix, include a sentence explaining that supplementary materials are included, e.g., “Supplementary materials are included in the web appendix accompanying the online version of this article.”
  • If you wish to be considered for the Ferber Award, include a sentence stating that the manuscript is based on the lead author’s dissertation

Note:

  • Use third person throughout (e.g., “The authors thank…”).
  • The author order and the styling of print names (e.g., Jan Smith vs. Jan M. Smith) must be identical to the order and styling in the authorship list on the first page.
  • We cannot update the information listed in the author note after the corrected proof is published.

See our sample author note.


Abstract

The third page of the final manuscript should include an abstract (maximum of 200 words) that substantively summarizes the article and addresses the following:

  • Topic/Issue
  • Approach/Methods
  • Results/Findings
  • Implications/Conclusions

Note:

  • Do not include any citations, tables, or figures in your abstract.
  • Do not include any information that is not in your article.
  • Write in the third person (avoid using “I” or “we“).
  • Be concise; avoid expressions such as “we found that consumers…” (i.e., omit “we found that…” and just write “consumers…” instead).

In crafting your abstract, recognize that JCR is an interdisciplinary journal and we aspire to being read and cited by scholars in a wide variety of disciplines. In most cases, the title and the abstract are the only part of an article that scholars will see in online indexing databases and search engines such as Google Scholar and Web of Science. A well-constructed and informative abstract should make your article discoverable to a larger number of scholars, which could lead to more citations.

Make the writing in your abstract accessible, so that the importance of your article will be transparent to a wide variety of scholars. Include terms and descriptions that will allow your article to be found by scholars interested in your theories, substantive findings, and methods. For instance, a manuscript investigating processing style by comparing adults across the age span should reference both the relevant theories of processing and the operationalization through age, such that scholars with either interest would be drawn to the work.

See our sample abstract.


Keywords

The third page of the final manuscript should also include a list of three to six keywords in a separate paragraph after the abstract.

The keywords will be hyperlinked and searchable on the OUP platform to enhance discoverability and attract readers.


Data Collection Paragraph

The data collection paragraph should appear on a new page before the references (or before the appendixes if applicable).

Write in the third person (e.g., “The authors jointly analyzed the data.”) and provide the following information for each study:

  • Where the data were collected
  • When the data were collected
  • Who collected the data
  • Who analyzed the data
  • Where the data are currently stored

Include university names and other identifying details. If a research assistant or lab manager collected data under the supervision of one of the authors, this should be stated in the data collection paragraph. However, authors are not required to provide the names of research assistants or lab managers.

If you wish to include a link to your archived data (this is optional), include a sentence at the end of your data collection paragraph noting this, e.g., “Data are available at INSERT URL.”

Our research ethics guidelines provide sample data collection paragraphs.


Appendixes

If manuscript appendixes are provided, they should begin on a new page (after the data collection paragraph) before the references.

Note:

  • A manuscript appendix is distinct from a web appendix containing supplementary materials. A manuscript appendix contains content that is integral to the manuscript.
  • Multiple appendixes are labeled with letters (Appendix A, Appendix B, etc.). A single appendix is labeled without the letters (Appendix).
  • Manuscript appendixes must follow all manuscript formatting guidelines (exceptions include stimuli, instruments, and other content included in its original form).

References

The references should appear on a new page after the appendixes (or after the data collection paragraph if there are no appendixes).

Each reference should be cited in the text at an appropriate place. Do not include references that have no corresponding citations in the text, and be sure that you have provided the complete reference for every in-text citation.

Note:

  • There must be a reference for every citation and a citation for every reference.
  • References must be double spaced with a half-inch (1.27 cm) hanging indent.
  • Our style guide contains detailed instructions on formatting references.

Tables

Tables for accepted manuscripts must be included in the final manuscript. Detailed instructions on formatting tables are provided in our style guide.

Note:

  • Place your tables within the main text of the final manuscript.
  • Each table should be numbered consecutively.
  • All titles, labels, and notes should be included with each table.
  • Refer to tables in text by number (e.g., table 1)
  • Do not refer to tables using terms such as “above,” “below,” “preceding,” or “the following.”
  • The typesetter requires an editable version of each table; use Word’s table feature with columns and rows (do not insert tables in text boxes or as images).
  • If necessary, you may include tables in landscape orientation (but please ensure the other manuscript contents are in portrait orientation).
Specific Table Guidelines
  • Capitals: Only the initial letter of a given word, phrase, or columnar head in a table is capitalized.
  • Columns: Decimals must be aligned.
  • Heads: All columns must have headings; each column head must relate to its subhead.
  • Labels: Number each table. Table labels must be centered and typed in all capital letters, e.g., TABLE 1.
  • Notes: Notes cued by lowercase superscript letters appear at the bottom of the table below the rule, paragraph indented. Descriptive information in addition to any notes should be placed above the notes, paragraph indented.
  • Tables with text only: Tables with text only should be formatted in the same way as tables with numbers (as Word tables with columns, rows, and individual cells).
  • Titles: Tables must have a short descriptive title. Table titles must be centered and typed in all capital letters.
  • Typefaces: Use only sans serif typefaces (e.g., Helvetica, Arial) in tables.

Figures

Figures for accepted manuscripts must be included in the final manuscript. In addition, the typesetter requires separate figures files that should also be forwarded to the editorial office with the final manuscript.

Note:

  • It is the author’s responsibility to obtain all necessary permissions for figures prior to publication.
  • Place your figures within the main text of the final manuscript.
  • Each figure should be numbered consecutively.
  • All titles, labels, and notes should be included with each figure.
  • Refer to figures in text by number (e.g., figure 1)
  • Do not refer to figures using terms such as “above,” “below,” “preceding,” or “the following.”
Specific Figure Guidelines
  • Axes: Label both vertical and horizontal axes. The ordinate label should be centered above the ordinate axis; the abscissa label should be placed flush right, beneath the abscissa. Place all calibration tics inside the axis lines and their values outside the axis lines. If the junction of the axes is zero, there should be only one zero.
  • Error Bars: When graphing means, the inclusion of error bars is optional. However, if error bars are reported, they must be the 95% confidence interval.
  • Labels: Number each figure. Figure labels must be centered and typed in all capital letters, e.g., FIGURE 1.
  • Legends: Legends should be placed horizontally, if possible, either in an appropriate white space in the figure or centered beneath the figure.
  • Lines: Clearly differentiate lines within figures. Variations include bold line, fine line, broken line, dotted line, etc. Lines within the figure should be identified by either a legend or a short description in a note.
  • Notes and Source Lines: Notes and source lines appear at the bottom of the table or figure, indented and aligned to the left. Descriptive information in addition to any notes should be placed above the notes, paragraph indented.
  • Space: When boxes are used to delimit text or freespace drawings in figures, white space inside boxes should be kept to a minimum.
  • Titles: Each figure must have its own descriptive title. Figure titles must be centered and typed in all capital letters.
  • Typefaces: Use only sans serif typefaces (e.g., Helvetica, Arial) in figures. Lettering on all figures must be professional in appearance and large enough to be easily read when reduced to actual size.
Color Reproduction

Figures supplied in color will be published in color online at no charge to the author. However, authors are charged for print reproduction of color figures, so you may consider grayscaling images.

When you receive the proof from the publisher, you will be asked to indicate whether you wish to incur the cost of printing color figures or prefer to have them published in black and white at no additional cost. Payment of color reproduction fees is handled entirely by OUP.

Figure Files
  • You must also send a separate file for each figure included in the final manuscript (including figures in the appendixes, if applicable).
  • However, do not send separate files for figures included in a web appendix file.
  • Omit labels, titles, and notes from the separate figure files.
  • Figures such as flowcharts, drawings, slides, maps, bar/pie/line/column charts that are created in Excel, PowerPoint, or Word can be provided as source files.
  • Figures can be submitted in TIFF, GIF, JPG, PDF, Postscript, EPS, Excel, Word, PowerPoint, or RTF formats.
  • TIFF format (.tiff) is recommended for halftone and composite images.
  • EPS format (.eps) is recommended for line art and vector graphics.

Headings List

To ensure accurate typesetting, authors must provide a list of headings in the order they appear in the manuscript. The headings list should appear on a new page at the end of the final manuscript file (after the figures) as follows:

     1) PRIMARY HEADING
     2) Secondary Heading
     3) Tertiary Heading
     2) Secondary Heading
     3) Tertiary Heading
     1) PRIMARY HEADING

Note:

  • Use only numbers 1, 2, and 3 to designate the type of heading (e.g., do not create a list numbering the headings as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, etc.).
  • Secondary headings must follow a primary heading.
  • You must use at least two secondary headings (or no secondary headings) in a section.
  • Tertiary headings must follow a secondary heading.
  • You may use only one tertiary heading (or no tertiary headings) in a section.

Web Appendix

Authors are encouraged to provide a supplementary document (i.e., a web appendix) containing stimuli, instruments, replication studies, or additional information not included in the manuscript that will accompany the online version of your article. The contents of the web appendix should be supplements or enhancements only (not content integral to the article).

The web appendix will not be copyedited or proofed. It will be published (almost exactly as provided) when the accepted manuscript is posted on Advance Access and changes cannot be made to the web appendix during the proofing process.

A link to the web appendix (labeled as “Supplementary Data”) will be included at the end of the table of contents in the online version of the article. In-text mentions in the manuscript will also link to the web appendix.

Note:

  • It is the author’s responsibility to obtain all necessary permissions for figures or other third-party included in the web appendix prior to publication.
  • Provide only one (1) web appendix file containing all supplementary materials.
  • The web appendix must be provided as a Word file and follow our manuscript formatting guidelines (exceptions include stimuli, instruments, and other content that is included in its original form).
  • Include a title page with the article title, author names, and a brief paragraph describing the contents of the web appendix or a table of contents.
  • Multiple web appendixes are labeled with letters (Web Appendix A, Web Appendix B, etc.); a single web appendix is labeled without the letters (Web Appendix).
  • In the author note of your final manuscript, include a sentence explaining that supplementary materials are included, e.g., “Supplementary materials are included in the web appendix accompanying the online version of this article.”
  • Mention the web appendix in-text where relevant (e.g., “See the web appendix for additional details.” or “See web appendix B for details.”)
  • See our recommendations for including content in Excel files containing many columns or worksheets or media files.

Correspondence

Authors must designate a corresponding author in the author note.

The designated corresponding author should communicate with the editorial office and OUP on behalf of all authors during the production and publication process.

The designated corresponding author is expected to coordinate with co-authors as necessary and should remain the point of contact for queries about the published article.


Permissions

It is your responsibility to obtain permission to reproduce figures and other third-party content that will appear in your article or web appendix prior to acceptance.

If your manuscript contains content that requires permission to reproduce, make sure you have obtained all relevant permissions and that the correct permission text has been used as required by the copyright holders.

OUP provides detailed guidelines to help authors determine when permission is needed to use third-party content and answer common questions pertaining to the process of obtaining permissions. See the “Rights and permissions guidelines for authors” section of OUP’s Rights and Permissions webpage or contact OUP with questions regarding permissions.

Due to the complexity of copyright issues, all permissions-related queries are handled by OUP. Editorial office staff are unable to advise on what constitutes fair use of third-party content or how to obtain necessary permissions.


Research Ethics

Authors should review the journal’s research ethics policies carefully prior to submitting the final version of their accepted manuscript and note the seven (7) year data maintenance requirement:


Licensing and Advance Access

After all required materials are provided, the managing editor will forward the files to our publisher, Oxford University Press (OUP).

The corresponding author will receive a welcome email from OUP’s production department (within two business days) with the assigned DOI and instructions to complete the publication license.

JCR does not charge a publication fee. The only fees related to publishing your article are optional (open access and print reproduction of color figures)

After the licensing is completed, OUP will publish the accepted version of your article and the web appendix (if applicable) on Advance Access. The accepted version will only be available in PDF format and labeled as an ACCEPTED MANUSCRIPT until the corrected proof publishes. The PDF will indicate that it has not been copyedited or typeset but can be cited or quoted using the DOI.

OUP’s website has additional information about licensing and the publication process. Licensing is handled entirely by OUP.


Open Access

JCR is a hybrid open access journal and authors may choose to pay an open access fee to make their accepted manuscript freely available online.

As part of the licensing process, you will be asked to indicate whether or not you wish to pay for open access.

OUP’s website has additional information on open access publishing and compliance with funder policies when publishing your article. Payment of open access fees and assistance with funder compliance is handled entirely by OUP.


Proofs

Approximately three weeks after submitting the license, the corresponding author will receive a separate email with a link to OUP’s online proofing system and instructions for submitting corrections to the manuscript proof.

The copyeditor and typesetter will make corrections and modifications to the manuscript, so it is important to review the proof very carefully.

The corresponding author should submit corrections and respond to queries on the proof within three business days. To avoid publication delays and ensure that the article is published with your corrections, please adhere to this timeframe and respond to all queries. If you expect to be away from email and unable to receive your proofs, or if you need extra time to review your proof, notify the editorial office.

Corrections should be restricted to typos, formatting, and factual errors (no other changes may be made to the manuscript at this stage). Changes contradicting journal style cannot be made.

For all matters not covered by the style guide, JCR follows the Chicago Manual of Style.

After the corrections are provided, the final version of your article will publish and remain on Advance Access (labeled as a CORRECTED PROOF) until it publishes to an issue.

OUP’s website has additional information about proofing and the publication process.

Note: Only the manuscript will be copyedited and typeset. The web appendix will be published almost exactly as provided, and changes cannot be made to the web appendix during the proofing process.


Post-Publication Updates

Per OUP policy, changes cannot be made to your article after online publication of the corrected proof (this includes articles on Advance Access that have not yet published to an issue) without publishing a formal correction notice.

An erratum may be published if the typesetter or editorial office makes an error when processing the accepted manuscript or corrected proof.

A corrigendum may be published if the publication record is seriously affected by the academic accuracy of published information. Corrections may include scholarly material specific to the publication such as stimuli, data, a description of procedures, and other experimental materials. All other material posted as corrections must be approved by the journal’s editors and Policy Board.

If authors wish to make a correction, the corresponding author must request the correction via email to the editorial office.

A proof of the erratum or corrigendum will be sent to the corresponding author, and the erratum or corrigendum will publish with its own separate DOI and link to the article being corrected. The online version of the original article will also be corrected and the correction notice will mention this.


Publication Rights

After the corrected proof publishes online, the corresponding author will receive a link providing free access to the article. This link can be shared with colleagues and contacts.

Authors should review the author self-archiving policy before posting versions of their work on their website, their institution’s website, or other repositories. Note that JCR has a 12-month embargo period for accepted manuscripts.

Detailed information regarding publication rights and permissions for reuse or republication of JCR content is available on OUP’s website. Due to the complexity of copyright matters, all queries related to publication rights and permissions are handled by OUP’s Rights and Permissions department.


If you have any questions, please contact the editorial office.