Evaluating Consumer Culture Research Papers

Consumer culture research (also referred to as “CCT” research) in JCR addresses consumer behavior phenomena in their socio-cultural context, usually employing ethnographic and sociological analyses. The focus is on exploring consumer behavior in depth, rather than being necessarily generalizable or representative.

Typical papers may identify a problem, question, or phenomenon that may be challenging to the theoretical status quo of CCT research and consumer research in general. CCT papers may also explore a phenomenon that has not yet received enough scholarly attention despite having a significant impact on the lives of consumers.

Evaluation Criteria

  • Does the paper strive for completeness, coherence, and a fair representation of the theoretical status quo in CCT and related disciplines (e.g., sociology, anthropology, cultural studies)?
  • Is the manuscript methodologically and theoretically transparent and timely enough? Is it clear how themes and/or analytical categories were derived?
  • Is the theorization complete and are boundary conditions set adequately? Have data and theory been sufficiently integrated? Is the data generative enough of novel theorizing?
  • How much does the manuscript give back to future CCT research and consumer research in general? How generative is the work of future CCT scholarship?
  • Are the theoretical implications of the analysis and/or studies far-reaching and concrete enough? Is each theoretical implication developed deeply and conscientiously?

Examples of Consumer Culture Research Papers

Dolbec, Pierre-Yann and Eileen Fischer (2015), “Refashioning a Field? Connected Consumers and Institutional Dynamics in Markets,” Journal of Consumer Research, 41 (April), 1447-68. https://doi.org/10.1086/680671

Humphreys, Ashlee (2010), “Semiotic Structure and the Legitimation of Consumption Practices: The Case of Casino Gambling,” Journal of Consumer Research, 37 (October), 490-510. https://doi.org/10.1086/652464

Karababa, Eminegül and Güliz Ger (2011), “Early Modern Ottoman Coffeehouse Culture and the Formation of the Consumer Subject,” Journal of Consumer Research, 37 (February), 737-60. https://doi.org/10.1086/656422

See more: How Do We Evaluate JCR Papers?

The Editors

Bernd Schmitt, June Cotte, Markus Giesler, Andrew Stephen, and Stacy Wood are the current editors of the Journal of Consumer Research.

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